Our research seeks to document and respond to alterations in biodiversity in the wake of Globalization

 

Biological Invasions

Green Iguana in Puerto Rico. PC:  Matthew Sileo

Green Iguana in Puerto Rico. PC: Matthew Sileo

The influx of non-native species into native ecosystems is one of the principle threats to biodiversity worldwide. Our research explores the influence of trade and commerce on the rate at which non-native species establish.  Using Management models and data synthesis methods, we explore the establishment and impact of invasive species.

 
 

Coastal Conservation

Dune restoration, Plum Island, MA. PC: J. Lockwood

Dune restoration, Plum Island, MA. PC: J. Lockwood

Coastal ecosystems provide highly valued benefits to human populations and have deep cultural importance that can transcend socio-economic groups.   Despite this importance, coastal ecosystems are under significant threat due to development, over-exploitation and sea level rise.  We seek to document the fate of coastal biodiversity, and work toward conserving and responsibly Harvesting species of high human value.  For more see the Center for Fisheries and Ocean Sustainability.

 

Wildlife Trade

Green python for sale at a pet expo. PC: J. Lockwood

Green python for sale at a pet expo. PC: J. Lockwood

trade in live animals has increased dramatically over the past several decades. Today Thousands of species of Fish, birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians are sold as live food or as pets. Several of these species are exploited to the extent that they are threatened with extinction. Other species find their way into non-native habitats and become invasive. We explore the socio-ecological dynamics of this trade in an effort to prevent extinction and invasion.